Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Key

Since its inception, Key School has encouraged independent thinking and openness to differing ideas and perspectives. We believe that we learn and grow both as individuals and as a school community when students and adults of diverse backgrounds, abilities, and identities develop an understanding of and respect for our commonalities and differences. We believe that we learn and grow both as individuals and as a school community when students and adults of diverse backgrounds, abilities, and identities develop an understanding of and respect for our commonalities and differences.

This is vital to fulfilling Key’s promise to prepare our students for the challenges and responsibilities they will assume within an increasingly connected yet diverse and pluralistic world community.

Therefore, we seek a student body, faculty, staff, administration, and governing board that reflect diversity across a broad spectrum, including race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, family composition, socioeconomic background, political viewpoint, and religion. While we are committed to acknowledging the varied beliefs
and values of every individual who is part of our community, our first priority
is to the Mission of our School, especially in sustaining an ethical school
culture that respects the dignity of every human being.

Upcoming Events

BIPOC Affinity Meeting - All BIPOC members of our community are invited to join this month's affinity meeting on Monday, May 17 from 6:00-7:30 p.m.  Middle School Division Head Dave Magnus and Upper School Division Head Brian Michaels will be attending.

 


 

June is LGBTQ Pride Month

As we celebrate LGBTQ Pride Month, let us all take time to learn more about the important milestones that led to the official celebration of Gay Pride.

The History of LGBTQ+

Timeline

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June 28, 1969 - In New York, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay club in Greenwich Village, which resulted in bar patrons, staff and neighborhood residents rioting onto Christopher Street outside. Learn more about the Stonewall Riots

June 28, 1970- On the first anniversary of the police raid on the Stonewall Inn, gay activists in New York organized the Christopher Street Liberation March to cap off the city's first Gay Pride Week. As several hundred people began marching up Sixth Avenue toward Central Park, supporters from the crowd joined them. The procession eventually stretched some 15 city blocks, encompassing thousands of people.

June 25, 1978 -The rainbow flag, which has become a universal symbol of hope for LGBTQ people around the world, first flew in San Francisco's United Nations Plaza for Gay Pride Day.It was designed by Gilbert Baker, an openly gay artist and activist. 

June 26, 2015 - The U.S. Supreme Court makes same sex marriage legal in all 50 states.

 

Here are a few additional resources we hope you find interesting

Pride Month Readings

 

 

Learn more about previous months' affinity and heritage celebrations here.

Campus Initiatives and Resources


 

Our Summer Reading - Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad

We find it important to engage our community with the purpose of education, reconciliation and restoration.  Educational institutions have the unique opportunity and obligation to create inclusive, anti-racist learning environments.  The cultivation of these types of environments are developed intentionally and are multifaceted. In addition to Dialogues for Justice, all members of Key's faculty and staff are reading Me and White Supremacy this summer.  Authored by Layla Saad, this book offers readers a 28-day journey to combat racism through "workbook" activities, cultural and historical information, stories, and definitions.  This is just one part of our summer Professional Development that will guide us in strategic planning for inclusivity and justice at Key School.